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tomorrow? >> the main thing is just open, honest, transparent governing. unfortunately we're going in the opposite direction. this really needs to be fully vetted by the press and looked at closely. there's gambling expansion that we're voting on in november. that happened in a closed session. the public really wasn't allowed in. here's the thing, lisa. they gave the gambling companies huge tax reductions. wouldn't you or a small business in maryland like a tax reduction? >> you're not for gambling in america. are we seeing money come in as a result of it though? >> barely. we've spent $266 million to buy this slot machines with taxpayer money and we're just getting up to where we're finally breaking even as far as revenues. the key thing about gambling is, doesn't produce money for education. doesn't produce jobs. doesn't produce new revenue. you're seeing that reflected in the polls. but it's -- i say to people in baltimore, if you love gambling and think it's great, still vote against question seven. that special session was corrupt. i mean, there's no other way to describe it.
of government without having to impose tax. way of short circuiting the political system. that's probably why they are opposed to that. for african-americans, reasons may be a little more complex. first, many belong to religious denominations that take a dim view of gambling. second, the largest concentration of african-americans in the state is this country where the new casino would go. >> pollsteres all probed who feels more intense about the issue? 54% of those claiming that expanded gaming is most likely to get them out to the polls plan to vote against it. so the pro and con tv ads may not be helping either side's cause. >> i think if they succeeded in making people angry on both sides. >> that was david collins reporting. >>> imagine 80% voter turnout in the united states. believe it or not, that was the actual statistic voting in the 2008 presidential election in one segment of the population. adults from families earning at least $100,000 a year. on the flip side, the census bureau reports those earning $20,000 or less a year had a 52% turnout. the gap has to do with how much voters
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2

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